New friends and fellow worshipers wanted! 


Welcome

If you like a small community of worshipers where everybody knows your name, we welcome you to the Episcopal Church of St. Mary Magdalene on Montgomery Rd. just north of Columbia Rd. in Landen. We share facilities with Deerfield United Methodist Church and Sunday service is at 9:30. This is a family of believers that can be traced back to Jesus Christ and his disciples- but is as modern as tomorrow. Come and believe with us.

On Sunday morning we have a great time figuring out what the Bible teaches us and our need to know.

Serving Maineville, Deerfield Township, Landen, Loveland,

Foster, South Lebanon,  Rivers Bend, Hamilton Township and environs.

 

It's no secret that the clear majority of those in Episcopal Church pews on Sunday mornings were not born Episcopalians.  Most of us came from other Christian denominations or from no church background at all.  So, what's the draw?

 

Since many converts come as adults, chances are logic and reason play a role in a person’s decision to become an Episcopalian.  The Episcopal Church has consistently been labeled as a “middle road” between Roman Catholicism and Protestantism.  We bring the reverence and rootedness of ancient tradition alongside a clear devotion to the Bible and priesthood of all believers.  In years past, in fact, some people suggested that were America to unite under one central religion, it just might be the Episcopal Church.  It is worth noting that the National Cathedral in Washington, DC, host to some of the nation’s most important religious events, is an Episcopal church.

 


Presiding Bishop’s Easter Message

It's taken me some years to realize it, but Jesus didn't just happen to be in Jerusalem on that first Palm Sunday. He wasn't on vacation. He wasn't just hanging out in town. Jesus was in Jerusalem on purpose. He arrived in Jerusalem about the time of the Passover when pilgrims were in the city. When people's hopes and expectations for the dawn of freedom that Moses had promised in the first Passover might suddenly be realized for them in their time.

Jesus arranged his entrance into Jerusalem to send a message. He entered the city, having come in on one side of the city, the scholars tell us, at just about the same time that Pontius Pilate made his entrance on the exact opposite side of the city. Pilate, coming forth on a warhorse. Pilate, with soldiers around him. Pilate, with the insignias of Rome's Empire. Pilate, representing the Caesars who claimed to be son of god. Pilate, who had conquered through Rome the people of Jerusalem. Pilate, representing the Empire that had taken away their freedom. Pilate, who represented the Empire that would maintain the colonial status of the Jewish people by brute force and violence.

Jesus entered the city on the other side, not on a warhorse, but on a donkey, recalling the words of Zechariah:

Behold your King comes to you
Triumphant and victorious is He
Humble and riding on a donkey

Jesus entered the city at the same time as Pilate to show them, and to show us, that God has another way. That violence is not the way. That hatred is not the way. That brute force and brutality are not the way.

Jesus came to show us there is another way. The way of unselfish, sacrificial love. That's why he entered Jerusalem. That's why he went to the cross. It was the power of that love poured out from the throne of God, that even after the horror of the crucifixion would raise him from death to life.

God came among us in the person of Jesus to start a movement. A movement to change the face of the earth. A movement to change us who dwell upon the earth. A movement to change the creation from the nightmare that is often made of it into the dream that God intends for it.

He didn't just happen to be in Jerusalem on that Palm Sunday. He went to Jerusalem for a reason. To send a message. That not even the titanic powers of death can stop the love of God.  On that Easter morning, he rose from the dead, and proclaimed love wins.

So you have a blessed Easter. Go forth to be people of the Resurrection. Follow in the way of Jesus. Don't be ashamed to love. Don't be ashamed to follow Jesus.

Have a blessed Easter.  And bless the world.  Amen.

The Most Rev. Michael B. Curry
Presiding Bishop and Primate
The Episcopal Church
 

 

 

 

 

WHEN JESUS FIRST SPEAKS to Mary as he stands behind her and asks about her tears, she is unsure who is addressing her. Thinking that he could be the gardener, she answers, “Sir, if you have carried him away, tell me where you have put him, and I will get him.”

The stranger does not respond, and Mary turns away to face the tomb again. Then she hears a voice simply calling, “Mary.”

Immediately Mary recognizes the voice as the same voice that had addressed her with the same gentleness and tenderness at a time when she had become accustomed to hearing scorn and derision. She could never forget that voice! Now as it calls out to her, she cries out, “Rabboni,” an Aramaic word that means “Teacher.”

There are few more powerful scenes in any of the four Gospels. To appreciate just a little of its poignancy, imagine yourself in Mary’s place, hearing your name being called by the Risen One. …

Mary’s experience invites us into a deeper appreciation of what the Easter message is truly about. It reminds us that at the heart of all things lies a resurrection love that seeks us passionately, calls us by name, and desires a personal relationship with each of us; that the resurrected Jesus and the God whom he reveals know each of us uniquely and individually. When we realize this, as Mary did, everything changes. …

We are not the insignificant and isolated individuals that we sometimes imagine. Rather, we are eternal creatures of infinite worth, living in a universe permeated by brilliant rays of resurrection love and mercy and grace.

– Trevor Hudson
Hope Beyond Your Tears